Tag Archive for: erectile dysfunction

Posts

Article of the Week: Penile lengthening and widening without grafting according to a modified ‘sliding’ technique

Every Week the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

Finally, the third post under the Article of the Week heading on the homepage will consist of additional material or media. This week we feature a video from Dr. Franklin Kuehhas, discussing his paper. 

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Penile lengthening and widening without grafting according to a modified ‘sliding’ technique

Paulo H. Egydio and Franklin E. Kuehhas*

 

Centre for Peyronies Disease Reconstruction, Sao Paulo, Brazil, and *London Andrology Institute, Suite 7 Exhibition House, Addison Bridge Place, London, UK

 

OBJECTIVE

To present the feasibility and safety of penile length and girth restoration based on a modified ‘sliding’ technique for patients with severe erectile dysfunction (ED) and significant penile shortening, with or without Peyronie’s disease (PD).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Between January 2013 and January 2014, 143 patients underwent our modified ‘sliding’ technique for penile length and girth restoration and concomitant penile prosthesis implantation. It is based on three key elements: (i) the sliding manoeuvre for penile length restoration; (ii) potential complementary longitudinal ventral and/or dorsal tunical incisions for girth restoration; and (iii) closure of the newly created rectangular bow-shaped tunical defects with Buck’s fascia only.

RESULTS

In all, 143 patients underwent the procedure. The causes of penile shortening and narrowing were: PD in 53.8%; severe ED with unsuccessful intracavernosal injection therapy in 21%; post-radical prostatectomy 14.7%; androgen-deprivation therapy, with or without brachytherapy or external radiotherapy, for prostate cancer in 7%; post-penile fracture in 2.1%; post-redo-hypospadias repair in 0.7%; and post-priapism in 0.7%. In patients with ED and PD, the mean (range) deviation of the penile axis was 45 (0‒100)°. The mean (range) subjective penile shortening reported by patients was 3.4 (1‒7) cm and shaft constriction was present in 53.8%. Malleable penile prostheses were used in 133 patients and inflatable penile prostheses were inserted in 10 patients. The median (range) follow-up was 9.7 (6‒18) months. The mean (range) penile length gain was 3.1 (2‒7) cm. No penile prosthesis infection caused device explantation. The average International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) score increased from 24 points at baseline to 60 points at the 6-month follow-up.

CONCLUSION

Penile length and girth restoration based on our modified sliding technique is a safe and effective procedure. The elimination of grafting saves operative time and, consequently, decreases the infection risk and costs associated with surgery.

Editorial: Is the modified sliding technique the way forward in Peyronie’s surgery?

The old goal of prosthetic surgery, which aimed to guarantee a hard and straight penis good enough for penetrative intercourse, is likely to have now become obsolete. Various authors have reported that patients with Peyronie’s disease (PD) and severe corporal fibrosis who undergo penile prosthesis implantation tend to report the lowest satisfaction rates, mainly because of significant penile length loss [1, 2]. In particular, according to Kueronya et al. [3], ~80% of patients affected by PD perceive a degree of penile shortening before surgery, and any further loss of length attributable to the surgical correction leads to bother among all the affected patients. All attempts at penile length restoration during prosthetic surgery should therefore be welcomed in order to achieve higher patient satisfaction.

Initial attempts at penile length restoration involved a full disassembly of the penis and the use of a circumferential graft [4]. Then, in 2012, Rolle et al. [5] described the sliding technique, a modification of the circumferential graft that consists of a double dorsal-ventral patch and should therefore provide more stability to the corpora cavernosa than a circumferential graft.

The present series by Egydio et al. [6] describes a modified sliding technique without grafting the defect of the tunica albuginea. This reduces the operating time and theoretically infection rates should therefore be reduced.

Although leaving a defect in the tunica albuginea should, in theory, lead to a haematoma formation and potentially infection of the device, in the present series, no penile prosthesis infections were reported.

Although we believe that cutting corners in surgery is not the way forward, the authors of the present paper should be congratulated because the postoperative results in their series are very encouraging. In fact, the mean penile length gain in their series was 3.1 cm, with no reported infections requiring the explantation of the penile prosthesis and with an average increase in International Index of Erectile Function score of 36.

Certainly, if the results of the present series can be confirmed in the future, this technique will revolutionize the concept that any tunical defect >1 cm in size needs to be grafted to prevent aneurysmal dilatation of the cylinders of an inflatable penile prosthesis [7], as none of the inflatable cylinders in the series developed aneurysms.

Giulio Garaffa, and David J. Ralph
St Peters Andrology and the Institute of Urology, University College London Hospitals, London, UK

 

References

 

1 Akin-Olugbade O, Parker M, Guhring P, Mulhall J. Determinants of patients satisfaction following penile prosthesis surgery. J Sex Med 2006; 3: 7438

 

2 Zacharakis E, Garaffa G, Raheem AA, Christopher AN, Muneer ARalph DJ. Penile prosthesis insertion in patients with refractory ischemic priapism: early versus delayed insertion. BJU Int 2014; 114: 57681

 

 

 

 

 

7 Ralph D, Gonzalez-Cadavid N, Mirone V et al. The management of Peyronies Disease: 2010 guidelines. J Sex Med 2010; 7: 235974

 

 

Video: Penile lengthening and widening without grafting according to a modified ‘sliding’ technique

Penile lengthening and widening without grafting according to a modified ‘sliding’ technique

Paulo H. Egydio and Franklin E. Kuehhas*

 

Centre for Peyronies Disease Reconstruction, Sao Paulo, Brazil, and *London Andrology Institute, Suite 7 Exhibition House, Addison Bridge Place, London, UK

 

OBJECTIVE

To present the feasibility and safety of penile length and girth restoration based on a modified ‘sliding’ technique for patients with severe erectile dysfunction (ED) and significant penile shortening, with or without Peyronie’s disease (PD).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Between January 2013 and January 2014, 143 patients underwent our modified ‘sliding’ technique for penile length and girth restoration and concomitant penile prosthesis implantation. It is based on three key elements: (i) the sliding manoeuvre for penile length restoration; (ii) potential complementary longitudinal ventral and/or dorsal tunical incisions for girth restoration; and (iii) closure of the newly created rectangular bow-shaped tunical defects with Buck’s fascia only.

RESULTS

In all, 143 patients underwent the procedure. The causes of penile shortening and narrowing were: PD in 53.8%; severe ED with unsuccessful intracavernosal injection therapy in 21%; post-radical prostatectomy 14.7%; androgen-deprivation therapy, with or without brachytherapy or external radiotherapy, for prostate cancer in 7%; post-penile fracture in 2.1%; post-redo-hypospadias repair in 0.7%; and post-priapism in 0.7%. In patients with ED and PD, the mean (range) deviation of the penile axis was 45 (0‒100)°. The mean (range) subjective penile shortening reported by patients was 3.4 (1‒7) cm and shaft constriction was present in 53.8%. Malleable penile prostheses were used in 133 patients and inflatable penile prostheses were inserted in 10 patients. The median (range) follow-up was 9.7 (6‒18) months. The mean (range) penile length gain was 3.1 (2‒7) cm. No penile prosthesis infection caused device explantation. The average International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) score increased from 24 points at baseline to 60 points at the 6-month follow-up.

CONCLUSION

Penile length and girth restoration based on our modified sliding technique is a safe and effective procedure. The elimination of grafting saves operative time and, consequently, decreases the infection risk and costs associated with surgery.

Article of the Week: A prospective study of erectile function after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy

Every Week the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

Finally, the third post under the Article of the Week heading on the homepage will consist of additional material or media. This week we feature a video from Katie Murray discussing her paper. 

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

A prospective study of erectile function after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy

 

Murray KS1, Bailey J2, Zuk K3, Lopez-Corona E4, Thrasher JB1,4.

 

Department of Urology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, Kansas City, KS, USA.

University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, KS, USA.

Kansas City Veterans Administration Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

 

OBJECTIVE

To prospectively evaluate the effect of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy on erectile and voiding function at multiple time-points after biopsy.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

All men who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy completed a five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) before and at 1, 4 and 12 weeks after TRUS-guided biopsy. Statistical analyses used were a general descriptive analysis, continuous variables using a t-test and categorical data using chi-square analysis. A paired t-test was used to compare each patient’s baseline score to their own follow-up survey scores.

RESULTS

In all, 220 patients were enrolled with a mean age of 64.1 years and PSA level of 6.7 ng/dL. At initial presentation, 38.6% reported no erectile dysfunction (ED), 22.3% mild ED, 15.5% mild-to-moderate ED, 10% moderate ED, and 13.6% severe ED. On paired t-test there was a statistically significant reduction in IIEF-5 score at 1 week after biopsy compared with before biopsy (18.2 vs 15.5; P < 0.001). This remained significantly reduced at 4 (18.4 vs 17.3; P = 0.008) and 12 weeks (18.4 vs 16.9, P = 0.004) after biopsy.

CONCLUSIONS

The effects of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy on erectile function have probably been underestimated. It is important to be aware of these transient effects so patients can be appropriately counselled. The exact cause of this effect is yet to be determined.

Editorial: Temporary Erectile Dysfunction Following Prostate Biopsy

TRUS-guided prostate needle biopsy (PB) is considered to be the ‘gold standard’ for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. While serious side-effects (e.g. infection, sepsis and urinary retention) can occur after PB, they are relatively rare. Minor side-effects, including haematuria, haematospermia, rectal discomfort and bleeding, are more common but are usually self-limiting. As such, men undergoing biopsy are usually counselled about these risks, which generally occur at an acceptably low frequency and are outweighed by the potential benefits of PB.

Penile erection is a complex physiological process that occurs through a coordinated cascade of neurological, vascular, humoral and psychological events. Therefore, there are a multitude of factors that could ultimately influence or disrupt normal erectile function after PB, including type of anaesthetic, age, psychological stress and damage to the neurovascular bundles. Erectile dysfunction (ED) and worsening LUTS have been reported to occur after PB, but the true incidence and possible pathophysiology remain subject to debate. For example, in their manuscript entitled, ‘A prospective study of erectile function after transrectal ultrasound and prostate biopsy’, Murray et al. [1] conducted a prospective study assessing erectile function, measured by the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5), and LUTS, measured by the IPSS, after PB. The results suggest that there is a significant decrease in erectile function that persists up to 3 months after PB. By contrast, worsening LUTS were not documented at this time after PB.

The present prospectively conducted trial [1] supports the findings of some other retrospective studies [2], but contradicts others [3–5]. For example, Helfand et al. [6] previously documented that a diagnosis of prostate cancer can influence a man’s erectile function after PB. Similarly, Murray et al. [1] found that patients without a diagnosis of prostate cancer reported lower IIEF scores up to 3 weeks, whereas those diagnosed with the disease had significantly lower IIEF scores up to 3 months after PB. Taken together, these results support other studies [2,6] showing that the psychological stress associated with a cancer diagnosis might contribute to ED.

Other recent studies have supported the notion that PB does not influence the frequency of ED [3–5]. These data have been mainly obtained from studies of men undergoing repeated PB as part of an active surveillance protocol. Some of these discrepancies might be related to the timing of evaluation after PB (e.g. 3 vs 12 months). Nonetheless, other studies found that age may be a better predictor of changes in erectile function. For example, data obtained from Braun et al. [3] support that men who undergo multiple biopsies (a median of five PB) fail to report substantially decreased erectile function over time. Similarly, Hilton et al. [4] found that erectile function scores were strongly associated with age and sexual activity, and not number of PBs. In support of this age relationship, the present study found that men aged <60 years had lower IIEF scores only at 1 week, compared with those patients aged >60 years who continued to report sexual side-effects up to 3 months after PB [1].

When the results of Murray et al. [1] are considered in light of previous studies on this topic, it appears that patients should be counselled on the possibility of relatively short-term (‘acute’) changes in erectile function. However, it should also be emphasised that long-term ED might not be related to the PB procedure itself, but rather to other factors, including advanced age, psychological stress and/or prostate cancer diagnosis.

 

Brian Helfand

North Shore University Health System, Division of Urology, John and Carol Walter Center for Urological Health, Evanston, IL, USA.

University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

 

References

1 Murray KS, Bailey J, Zuk K, Lopez-Corona E, Thrasher JB. A prospective study of erectile function after transrectal ultrasound and prostate biopsy. BJU Int 2015; 116: 190–5

2 Zisman A, Leibovici D, Kleinmann J, Cooper A, Siegel Y, Lindner A. The impact of prostate biopsy on patient well-being: a prospective study of voiding impairment. J Urol 2001; 166: 2242–6

3 Braun K, Ahallal Y, Sjoberg DD et al. Effect of repeated prostate biopsies on erectile function in men on active surveillance for prostate cancer. J Urol 2014; 191: 744–9

4 Hilton JF, Blaschko SD, Whitson JM, Cowan JE, Carroll PR. The impact of serial prostate biopsies on sexual function in men on active surveillance for prostate cancer. J Urol 2012; 188: 1252–8

5 Chrisofos M, Papatsoris AG, Dellis A, Varkarakis IM, Skolarikos A, Deliveliotis C. Can prostate biopsies affect erectile function? Andrologia 2006; 38: 79–83

6 Helfand BT, Glaser AP, Rimar K et al. Prostate cancer diagnosis is associated with an increased risk of erectile dysfunction after prostate biopsy. BJU Int 2013; 111: 38–43

Video: A prospective study of erectile function after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy

A prospective study of erectile function after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy

 

Murray KS1, Bailey J2, Zuk K3, Lopez-Corona E4, Thrasher JB1,4.

 

Department of Urology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, Kansas City, KS, USA.

University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, KS, USA.

Kansas City Veterans Administration Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

 

OBJECTIVE

To prospectively evaluate the effect of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy on erectile and voiding function at multiple time-points after biopsy.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

All men who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy completed a five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) before and at 1, 4 and 12 weeks after TRUS-guided biopsy. Statistical analyses used were a general descriptive analysis, continuous variables using a t-test and categorical data using chi-square analysis. A paired t-test was used to compare each patient’s baseline score to their own follow-up survey scores.

RESULTS

In all, 220 patients were enrolled with a mean age of 64.1 years and PSA level of 6.7 ng/dL. At initial presentation, 38.6% reported no erectile dysfunction (ED), 22.3% mild ED, 15.5% mild-to-moderate ED, 10% moderate ED, and 13.6% severe ED. On paired t-test there was a statistically significant reduction in IIEF-5 score at 1 week after biopsy compared with before biopsy (18.2 vs 15.5; P < 0.001). This remained significantly reduced at 4 (18.4 vs 17.3; P = 0.008) and 12 weeks (18.4 vs 16.9, P = 0.004) after biopsy.

CONCLUSIONS

The effects of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy on erectile function have probably been underestimated. It is important to be aware of these transient effects so patients can be appropriately counselled. The exact cause of this effect is yet to be determined.

Article of the month – Good vibrations: better erectile function with penile vibratory stimulation

Every week the Editor-in-Chief selects the Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by prominent members of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

Finally, the third post under the Article of the Week heading on the homepage will consist of additional material or media. This week we feature a video from Dr. Fode discussing his paper.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Penile vibratory stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence and erectile function after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy: a randomized, controlled trial

Mikkel Fode*, Michael Borre, Dana A. Ohl, Jonas Lichtbach§ and Jens Sønksen*

*Department of Urology, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, and §Department of Physiotherapy, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark

OBJECTIVE

• To examine the effect of penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the preservation and restoration of erectile function and urinary continence in conjunction with nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

• The present study was conducted between July 2010 and March 2013 as a randomized prospective trial at two university hospitals which we already determined with the physiotherapy system with the professional and affordable physiotherapy merrylands  has to offer for the trials. Eligible participants were continent men with an International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) score of at least 18, scheduled to undergo nerve-sparing RP.

• Patients were randomized to a PVS group or a control group. Patients in the PVS group were instructed in using a PVS device (FERTI CARE® vibrator).

• Stimulation was performed at the frenulum once daily by the patients in their own homes for at least 1 week before surgery. After catheter removal, daily PVS was re-initiated for a period of 6 weeks.

• Participants were evaluated at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery with the IIEF-5 questionnaire and questions regarding urinary bother. Patients using up to one pad daily for security reasons only were considered continent. The study was registered at https://clinicaltrials.gov/ (NCT01067261).

RESULTS

• Data from 68 patients were available for analyses (30 patients randomized to PVS and 38 patients randomized to the control group).

• The IIEF-5 score was highest in the PVS group at all time points after surgery with a median score of 18 vs 7.5 in the control group at 12 months (P = 0.09), but the difference only reached borderline significance.

• At 12 months, 16/30 (53%) patients in the PVS group had reached an IIEF-5 score of at least 18, while this was the case for 12/38 (32%) patients in the control group (P = 0.07).

• There were no significant differences in the proportions of continent patients between groups at 3, 6 or 12 months. At 12 months 90% of the PVS patients were continent, while 94.7% of the control patients were continent (P = 0.46).

CONCLUSION

• The present study did not document a significant effect of PVS. However, the method proved to be acceptable for most patients and there was a trend towards better erectile function with PVS. More studies are needed to explore this possible effect further.

Editorial: Penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) a novel approach for penile rehabilitation post nerve sparing radical prostatectomy

The reported incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (NS-RP) varies in the literature from 30 to 80% [1]. This can be explained by the state of neuropraxia which affects the cavernosal nerves, even if the nerves are anatomically intact. During this period there is a lack of nocturnal tumescence which leads to tissue hypoxia and ischaemic damage to the cavernosal smooth muscles leading to smooth muscle necrosis and fibrosis, which in turn causes veno-occlusive dysfunction (VOD). A study by Mulhall et al. [2] showed that, at 12 months after NS-RP, 50% of patients will have VOD and ED. The role of penile rehabilitation, therefore, is to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation until the cavernosal nerves recover with the return of the spontaneous nocturnal tumescence; thus, penile rehabilitation should not be confused with ED treatment. If you see yourself as religious, addiction may make you feel guilty or get you to feel isolated among your friends at your religious organization. A spiritual Christian rehab center in Orlando may be the right choice for you. Not only do you get to meet like-minded people to share your experiences in your journey to sobriety, but the process may also help you to rediscover your faith in God. Legacy Healing Center Tampa offer programs that make spiritual guidance an important part of every type of addiction treatment. Orange County law enforcement has taken steps to make sure the drugs are not as easily available as they once were. This has helped manage Orlando’s drug problem and kept it from turning worse. As important as prevention is to saving lives, however, to the hundreds who are already addicted, rehab is what helps. If you are religious or spiritual, faith-based drug rehab can be the answer to the challenges that you face. It’s important to remember that faith-based rehab only works well for those who are deeply spiritual or religious. Trying faith-based rehab when you are ambivalent about religion can work against you. You may find that you aren’t able to accept what you’re asked to practice, and you may find yourself rebelling. It’s important to choose a treatment approach that you can go along with in good conscience.

Several lines of treatment, including phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, intracavernous injection of alprostadil and vacuum pump therapy, have been used in penile rehabilitation but an agreed rehabilitation programme in terms of agents used, timing and duration of therapy does not yet exist [1].

The present study by Fode et al. [3] reports a novel approach to penile rehabilitation using penile vibratory stimulation (PVS). The study looked into the effect of PVS on postoperative erection and continence. The Ferticare® vibrator (Fig. 1) was used at an amplitude of 2 mm and a vibration frequency of 100 Hz and applied to the frenulum once daily, with a sequence consisting of 10 s of stimulation followed by a 10-s rest and repeated 10 times.

The results showed a trend towards better erection in the PVS group (n = 30) compared with the control group (n = 38) as evidenced by the higher International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) score, but the difference was not significant (P = 0.09). After 1 year, 16 patients (53%) in the PVS group had an IIEF score ≥18 compared with 12 (32%) patients in the control group (P = 0.07). The results did not show any effect of treatment on continence; at 12 months, 90% of the PVS group achieved continence compared with 94.7% of the control group (P = 0.46), although the PVS group had a significantly higher preoperative LUTS score which may explain the results.

The theory postulated is that application of PVS activates the parasympathetic erectile spinal centre (S2–S4), which in turn leads to activation of the cavernosal nerves, enhancing the healing process, and recovery from neuropraxia and restoration of spontaneous erections. Also this would lead to stimulation of the somatic S2–S4 spinal centre, which controls the pelvic floor muscles via the pudendal nerve, leading to the recovery of continence. Although this has been shown in patients with spinal cord injury as the authors mentioned; this may not be the case in post NS-RP with the nerves in a state of neurapraxia, whereas in patients with spinal cord injury the nerves are intact. It would have been of great value to conduct neurophysiological tests on these patients to demonstrate that, despite the cavernosal nerves being in a state of neurapraxia, nerve activity in response to PVS was actually present.

The rehabilitation protocol used in the present study started early but only continued for 6 weeks postoperatively. Studies have shown that the potential recovery time of erectile function after NS-RP is 6–36 months, with the majority recovering within 12–24 months [1,4]. The results might have shown statistical significance in favour of PVS, had treatment continued for a longer period. Starting PVS treatment in the early postoperative period may not be suitable in all patients; in this study six out of 36 patients (16.6%) were non-compliant with the protocol; four had prolonged catheterization and two experienced pain. Furthermore, neurophysiological testing is required to show that in the early postoperative period the cavernosal nerves are actually intact and therefore respond to PVS.

Although the results of the present study did not reach significance, they are encouraging, as there was a trend in favour of treatment with regard to erectile function. Further studies involving larger numbers of patients are warranted to investigate this new line of rehabilitation.

Amr Abdel Raheem* and David Ralph
*Andrology Department, Cairo University Hospital, Cairo, Egypt, and St. Peter’s Andrology Centre, Institute of Urology, London, UK

References

  1. Mulhall JP, Bivalacqua TJ, Becher EF. Standard operating procedure for the preservation of erectile function outcomes after radical prostatectomy. J Sex Med 2013; 10: 195–203
  2. Mulhall JP, Slovick R, Hotaling J et al. Erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: hemodynamic profiles and their correlation with the recovery of erectile function. J Urol 2002; 167: 1371–5
  3. Fode M, Borre M, Ohl D, Lichtbach J, Sønksen J. Penile vibratory stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence and erectile function after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy: a randomized, controlled trial. BJU Int 2014; 114: 111–7
  4. Rabbani F, Schiff J, Piecuch M et al. Time course of recovery of erectile function after radical retropubic prostatectomy: does anyone recover after 2 years? J Sex Med 2010; 7: 3984–90

Video: Penile vibratory stimulation after radical prostatectomy

Penile vibratory stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence and erectile function after nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy: a randomized, controlled trial

Mikkel Fode*, Michael Borre, Dana A. Ohl, Jonas Lichtbach§ and Jens Sønksen*

*Department of Urology, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, and §Department of Physiotherapy, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark

OBJECTIVE

• To examine the effect of penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the preservation and restoration of erectile function and urinary continence in conjunction with nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

• The present study was conducted between July 2010 and March 2013 as a randomized prospective trial at two university hospitals. Eligible participants were continent men with an International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) score of at least 18, scheduled to undergo nerve-sparing RP.

• Patients were randomized to a PVS group or a control group. Patients in the PVS group were instructed in using a PVS device (FERTI CARE® vibrator).

• Stimulation was performed at the frenulum once daily by the patients in their own homes for at least 1 week before surgery. After catheter removal, daily PVS was re-initiated for a period of 6 weeks.

• Participants were evaluated at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery with the IIEF-5 questionnaire and questions regarding urinary bother. Patients using up to one pad daily for security reasons only were considered continent. The study was registered at https://clinicaltrials.gov/ (NCT01067261).

RESULTS

• Data from 68 patients were available for analyses (30 patients randomized to PVS and 38 patients randomized to the control group).

• The IIEF-5 score was highest in the PVS group at all time points after surgery with a median score of 18 vs 7.5 in the control group at 12 months (P = 0.09), but the difference only reached borderline significance.

• At 12 months, 16/30 (53%) patients in the PVS group had reached an IIEF-5 score of at least 18, while this was the case for 12/38 (32%) patients in the control group (P = 0.07).

• There were no significant differences in the proportions of continent patients between groups at 3, 6 or 12 months. At 12 months 90% of the PVS patients were continent, while 94.7% of the control patients were continent (P = 0.46).

CONCLUSION

• The present study did not document a significant effect of PVS. However, the method proved to be acceptable for most patients and there was a trend towards better erectile function with PVS. More studies are needed to explore this possible effect further.

 

Article of the week: No difference in sexual function seen between monopolar and bipolar TURP

Every week the Editor-in-Chief selects the Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Bipolar vs monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate: evaluation of the impact on overall sexual function in an international randomized controlled trial setting

Charalampos Mamoulakis1,2, Andreas Skolarikos3, Michael Schulze4, Cesare M. Scoffone5, Jens J. Rassweiler4, Gerasimos Alivizatos3, Roberto M. Scarpa5 and Jean J.M.C.H. de la Rosette1

1Department of Urology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 2Department of Urology, University Hospital of Heraklion, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 3Second Department of Urology, Sismanoglio Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece, 4Department of Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn, University of Heidelberg, Heilbronn, Germany, and 5Department of Urology, San Luigi Hospital, University of Turin, Orbassano, Turin, Italy

OBJECTIVE

• To compare monopolar and bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate (M-TURP and B-TURP, respectively) using a true bipolar system, for the first time in an international multicentre double-blind randomized controlled trial focusing on the overall sexual function quantified with the International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire (IIEF-15). Other baseline/perioperative parameters potentially influencing erectile function (EF) after TURP were secondarily investigated.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

• From July 2006 to June 2009, consecutive TURP candidates with benign prostatic obstruction were prospectively recruited in four academic urological centres, randomized 1:1 into M-TURP/B-TURP arms and followed up at 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months after surgery. In all, 295 eligible patients were enrolled.

• Overall sexual function was quantified using self-administered IIEF-15 at baseline and at each subsequent visit.

•  Total IIEF/domain scores were calculated and EF score classified erectile dysfunction severity. Differences in erectile dysfunction severity at each visit compared with baseline (EF evolution), classified patients into ‘improved’, ‘stable’ or ‘deteriorated’.

•  Pre-postoperative IIEF/domain scores and differences in the distribution of EF evolution were compared between arms throughout follow-up.

RESULTS

• In all, 279 patients received the allocated intervention; 218/279 patients (78.1%) provided complete IIEF-15 data at baseline and were considered in sexual function analysis. Complete IIEF-15 data were available from 193/218 (88.5%), 186/218 (85.3%) and 179/218 (82.1%) patients at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months, respectively.

• Sexual function did not differ significantly between arms during follow-up (scores: IIEF, P = 0.750; EF, P = 0.636; orgasmic function, P = 0.868; sexual desire, P = 0.735; intercourse satisfaction, P = 0.917; overall satisfaction, P = 0.927).

• Resection type was not a predictor of any sexual function changes observed.

• Distribution of EF evolution did not differ between arms at any time (M-TURP vs B-TURP at 12 months: improved, 23/87 [26.4%] vs 18/92 [19.6%]; stable, 53/87 [60.9%] vs 56/92 [60.8%]; deteriorated, 11/87 [12.7%] vs 18/92 [19.6%]; P = 0.323).

CONCLUSION

• There were no differences between M-TURP/B-TURP in any aspect of sexual function.

 

Read Previous Articles of the Week

 

© 2020 BJU International. All Rights Reserved.