Articles of the week

Article of the Week: Pain relief after ureteric stent removal: think NSAIDs

Every week the Editor-in-Chief selects the Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post. In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying blog written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at…

Editorial: Stent removal need not be painful

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Matthew Bultitude Urology Centre, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Ureteric stents are undoubtedly a significant cause of morbidity while in situ [1].Whilst there are different options for removal, they are usually removed under local anaesthetic with the aid of a flexible cystoscope. This is an uncomfortable procedure and a proportion of patients seem to get fairly severe pain afterwards, which may be attributable to ureteric spasm. The pain after stent removal…

Michael Conlin’s commentary on NSAIDs

Pain relief after ureteric stent removal: think NSAIDs Nicholas N. Tadros, Lisa Bland, Edith Legg, Ali Olyaei and Michael J. Conlin* Oregon Health & Science University and *Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center, Portland, OR, USA OBJECTIVES • To determine the incidence of severe pain after ureteric stent removal. • To evaluate the efficacy of a single dose of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) in preventing this complication. PATIENTS AND METHODS • A…

Article of the Week: The botulinum toxin benefit for overactive bladder

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Every week the Editor-in-Chief selects the Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post. In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying blog written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools…

Editorial: Is botulinum toxin not the solution to OAB after all?

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Dirk De Ridder Department of Urology, University Hospital Leuven, Belgium The article by Mohee et al. highlights a problem that is often neglected: the outomes we see in clinical trials do not predict the success of the therapy in real life. We know this from anticholinergics: the study results are good, but the performance in real life is much poorer. Only 20-40% will continue to take the medication. For botulinum toxin in OAB it is surprising to see that even in experienced hands only…

Article of the Week: The New Partin Tables

Every week the Editor-in-Chief selects the Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post. In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying blog written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools…

Editorial: What have we learned from the Partin table update?

The controversies surrounding a physician’s best treatment strategy advice to an individual patient with clinically localized prostate cancer create a continuing need for advanced statistics. Historically, the Partin tables [1] were one of the first statistical tools that physicians and patients found readily usable. The tables have been updated and always focused on prediction of pathologic stage from standard clinical variables. The next commonly cited/used tool was the Kattan nomogram [2] that…

John Eifler and Alan Partin discuss their article

An updated prostate cancer staging nomogram (Partin tables) based on cases from 2006 to 2011. John B. Eifler, Zhaoyang Feng, Brian M. Lin, Michael T. Partin, Elizabeth B. Humphreys, Misop Han, Jonathan I. Epstein, Patrick C. Walsh, Bruce J. Trock and Alan W. Partin James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute and the Department of Urology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA Objective To update the 2007 Partin tables in a contemporary patient population. Patients…
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