Tag Archive for: open prostatectomy

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Here comes the sun

BJUI-on-the-beach

Sun, sea, sand and stones: BJUI on the beach.

Welcome to this month’s BJUI and whether you are relaxing on a sun-drenched beach or villa somewhere having a hard-earned break, or back at your hospital covering for everyone else having their time off, we hope you will enjoy another fantastic issue. After an action packed BAUS meeting with important trial results, innovation, social media and the BJUI fully to the fore, this is a great moment to update yourself on what is hot in urology. This is probably the time of year when most urologists have a little extra time to take the BJUI out of its cover or open up the iPad and dig a little deeper into the articles, and we do not think you will be disappointed with this issue, which certainly has something for everyone.

In the ‘Article of the Month’, we feature an important paper from Egypt [1] examining factors associated with effective delayed primary repair of pelvic fractures that are associated with a urethral injury. Do be careful whilst you are travelling around the world, as most of the injuries in this paper were due to road traffic accidents. They reported 76/86 successful outcomes over a 7-year period. When a range of preoperative variables was assessed, four had particular significance for successful treatment outcomes. The paper really highlights that in the current urological world of robotics, laparoscopy and endourology, in some conditions traditional open surgery with delicate and precise tissue handling and real attention to surgical detail are the key components of a successful outcome.

Whilst you are eating and drinking more than usual over the summer, we have some food for thought on surgery and metabolic syndrome with one of our ‘Articles of the Week’. This paper contains an important message for all those performing bladder outflow surgery. This paper by Gacci et al. [2] from an international group of consecutive patients clearly shows that men with a waist circumference of >102 cm had a far higher risk of persistent symptoms after TURP or open prostatectomy. This was particularly true for storage symptoms in this group of men and should influence the consenting practice of all urologists carrying out this common surgery.

Make sure you are staying well hydrated on your beach this August, as the summer months often lead to increased numbers of patients presenting to emergency departments with acute ureteric colic, so it seems timely to focus on this area. To this end I would like to highlight one of our important ‘Guideline of Guidelines’ series featuring kidney stones [3] to add to the earlier ones on prostate cancer screening [4]and prostate cancer imaging [5]. This series serve to assimilate all of the major national and international guidelines into one easily digestible format with specific reference to the strength of evidence for each recommendation. Specifically, we look at the initial evaluation, diagnostic imaging selection, symptomatic management, surgical treatment, medical therapy, and prevention of recurrence for both ureteric and renal stones. Quite how the recent surprising results of the SUSPEND (Spontaneous Urinary Stone Passage ENabled by Drugs) trial will impact on the use of medical expulsive therapy remains to be seen [6].

So whether you are sitting watching the sunset with a drink in your hand or quietly working in your home at night, please dig a little deeper into this month’s BJUI on paper, online or on tablet. It will not disappoint and might just change your future practice.

 

References

 

 

3 Ziemba JB, Matlaga BR. Guideline of guidelines: kidney stones. BJU Int 2015; 116: 1849

 

4 Loeb S. Guideline of guidelines: prostate cancer screening. BJU Int 2014; 114: 3235

 

5 Wollin DA, Makarov DV. Guideline of guidelines: prostate cancer imaging. BJU Int 2015; [Epub ahead of print]. DOI: 10.1111/bju.13104

 

 

Ben Challacombe
Associate Editor, BJUI 

 

Article of the week: Large BPH responds well to bipolar plasma enucleation

Every week the Editor-in-Chief selects the Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

Finally, the third post under the Article of the Week heading on the homepage will consist of additional material or media. This week we feature a video of a bipolar plasma enucleation procedure from Dr Geavlete and colleagues.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Bipolar plasma enucleation of the prostate vs open prostatectomy in large benign prostatic hyperplasia cases – a medium term, prospective, randomized comparison

Bogdan Geavlete, Florin Stanescu, Catalin Iacoboaie and Petrisor Geavlete

Department of Urology, ‘Saint John’ Emergency Clinical Hospital, Bucharest, Romania

OBJECTIVES

• To evaluate the viability of bipolar plasma enucleation of the prostate (BPEP) by comparison with open transvesical prostatectomy (OP) in cases of large prostates with regard to surgical efficacy and peri-operative morbidity.

• To compare the medium-term follow-up parameters specific for the two methods.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

• A total of 140 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with prostate volume >80 mL, maximum flow rate (Qmax) <10 mL/s and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) >19 were randomized in the two study arms.

• All cases were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery by IPSS, Qmax, quality of life score (QoL) and post-voiding residual urinary volume (PVR).

• The prostate volume and prostate specific antigen (PSA) level were measured at 6 and 12 months.

RESULTS

• The BPEP and OP techniques emphasized similar mean operating durations (91.4 vs 87.5 min) and resected tissue weights (108.3 vs 115.4 g).

• The postoperative haematuria rate (2.9% vs 12.9%) as well as the mean haemoglobin drop (1.7 vs 3.1 g/dL), catheterization period (1.5 vs 5.8 days) and hospital stay (2.1 vs 6.9 days) were significantly improved for BPEP.

• Recatheterization for acute urinary retention was more frequent in the OP group (8.6% vs 1.4%), while the rates of early irritative symptoms were similar for BPEP and OP (11.4% vs 7.1%).

• During the follow-up period, no statistically significant difference was determined in terms of IPSS, Qmax, QoL, PVR, PSA level and postoperative prostate volume between the two series.

CONCLUSIONS

• BPEP represents a promising endoscopic approach in large BPH cases, characterized by good surgical efficiency and similar BPH tissue removal capabilities compared with standard transvesical prostatectomy.

• BPEP patients benefited from significantly reduced complications, shorter convalescence and satisfactory follow-up symptom scores and voiding parameters.

 

Read Previous Articles of the Week

 

Editorial: Bipolar plasma enucleation: a new gold standard for BPH?

The history of surgical enucleation for BPH dates back over 100 years and it continues to be the most complete and efficient method of removing adenomata of any size. The popularity and performance of the open approach has declined recently but new enucleation techniques have emerged. In this edition of the journal, Geavlete et al. have studied a recent addition to the endoscopic enucleation armamentarium, namely ‘plasma-button’ bipolar enucleation (BPEP). This procedure is a variation on bipolar endoscopic enucleation using a coiled electrode(or PkEEP) first described in 2006. These authors’ unique contribution to the literature is to compare electrosurgical endoscopic enucleation with open prostatectomy in large prostates (>80 g by TRUS) in a randomized trial and provide Level 1 evidence for this technique. The groups were well-matched preoperatively and were equivalent in terms of operating time, weight of tissue retrieved and postoperative variables up to 12-month follow-up. Significant advantages were noted in perioperative outcomes in favour of the endoscopic technique, particularly those outcomes related to blood loss and subsequent hospital stay. Although not specifically addressed, it is highly likely that substantial cost savings were also achieved and patients returned to normal activities sooner with the endoscopic approach.

Endoscopic enucleation for very large prostates using the Holmium laser as the energy source, was first described over a decade ago. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) has been compared with open prostatectomy in two randomized trials (Eur Urol 2006, Eur Urol 2008and similar advantages were noted to those of BPEP in the comparison. The next question is, therefore, which of the endoscopic enucleation techniques is superior? Before this question can be answered, we need to separate those techniques that merely resect large tissue fragments (a ‘mega-resection’), and call themselves ‘enucleation’, from those that truly involve complete enucleation of the anatomical lobes using established surgical planes. HoLEP clearly falls into the latter category but electrosurgical methods may or may not because the actual surgical plane, with both electrosurgery and continuous laser wavelengths such as the Thulium : YAG, 532 nm and Diode lasers, is more difficult to achieve and follow. Exponents of these alternative energy sources perform a variety of different procedures, ranging from resection and vaporization hybrids through to a true enucleation technique, all under the banner of ‘enucleation’. For example, green EP with a side-firing fibre, can be a true enucleation technique if blunt dissection is also employed or a ‘mega-resection’ if the laser energy is merely used to cut off the lobe as a single large fragment. The use of the morcellator is also variable, with some authors instead reverting to the resectoscope to resect the lobes while they remain attached at the bladder neck.

The movement back to enucleation techniques, which also yield tissue for analysis, is partly attributable to the desire to detect transition zone cancers but, more importantly, to address the inadequacy of other endoscopic procedures in treating the growing number of huge glands confronting the urologist as a long-term result of the rise of medical therapy. Traditionally, glands > 80–100 g have been thought to be unsuitable for TURP and morbidity becomes significant although laser techniques such as 532 nm vaporization with high-powered devices have been employed in large glands, albeit with prolonged operating times. Unsurprisingly, the retropubic and suprapubic techniques have also been re-visited by robotic surgeons but with more morbidity than HoLEP, although this will probably improve.

Endoscopic enucleation seems to be here to stay with mounting scientific and popular support. It remains to be seen which variation will gain ascendancy in the coming years, but commercial considerations rather than science will probably be the major determining factor.

Peter J. Gilling
Department of Urology, Tauranga Hospital, Tauranga, New Zealand

Video: Bipolar plasma enucleation vs open prostatectomy

Bipolar plasma enucleation of the prostate vs open prostatectomy in large benign prostatic hyperplasia cases – a medium term, prospective, randomized comparison

Bogdan Geavlete, Florin Stanescu, Catalin Iacoboaie and Petrisor Geavlete

Department of Urology, ‘Saint John’ Emergency Clinical Hospital, Bucharest, Romania

OBJECTIVES

• To evaluate the viability of bipolar plasma enucleation of the prostate (BPEP) by comparison with open transvesical prostatectomy (OP) in cases of large prostates with regard to surgical efficacy and peri-operative morbidity.

• To compare the medium-term follow-up parameters specific for the two methods.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

• A total of 140 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with prostate volume >80 mL, maximum flow rate (Qmax) <10 mL/s and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) >19 were randomized in the two study arms.

• All cases were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery by IPSS, Qmax, quality of life score (QoL) and post-voiding residual urinary volume (PVR).

• The prostate volume and prostate specific antigen (PSA) level were measured at 6 and 12 months.

RESULTS

• The BPEP and OP techniques emphasized similar mean operating durations (91.4 vs 87.5 min) and resected tissue weights (108.3 vs 115.4 g).

• The postoperative haematuria rate (2.9% vs 12.9%) as well as the mean haemoglobin drop (1.7 vs 3.1 g/dL), catheterization period (1.5 vs 5.8 days) and hospital stay (2.1 vs 6.9 days) were significantly improved for BPEP.

• Recatheterization for acute urinary retention was more frequent in the OP group (8.6% vs 1.4%), while the rates of early irritative symptoms were similar for BPEP and OP (11.4% vs 7.1%).

• During the follow-up period, no statistically significant difference was determined in terms of IPSS, Qmax, QoL, PVR, PSA level and postoperative prostate volume between the two series.

CONCLUSIONS

• BPEP represents a promising endoscopic approach in large BPH cases, characterized by good surgical efficiency and similar BPH tissue removal capabilities compared with standard transvesical prostatectomy.

• BPEP patients benefited from significantly reduced complications, shorter convalescence and satisfactory follow-up symptom scores and voiding parameters.

 

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