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Highlights from the Irish Society of Urology Annual Meeting 2018

 

Dr Kent T. Perry Jr. delivers a lecture on minimally invasive kidney surgery

The Irish Society of Urology annual meeting has a strong tradition of attracting world class guest speakers, and this year was no different. We were joined by Dr Kent T. Perry Jr. (Co-Director of the Minimally Invasive Surgery Program & Associated Professor at Northwestern University Chicago), Professor Hendrik Van Poppel (Adj. Secretary General of EAU for Education), Mr Jeremy Ockrim (Honorary Lecturer and Consultant Urologist at University College London), Mr Kieran O’Flynn (Immediate BAUS past president and Consultant Urologist at Salford Royal Foundation), and Dr Matthias Hofer (Assistant Professor at Dept. Urology, Northwestern University Chicago). The excellent programme of guest speakers started on Friday afternoon with Dr Matthias Hofer’s talk on urethral reconstruction-a ‘no frills’ overview of a complex topic which surely inspired several trainees in the room to consider a career in Reconstructive Urology.

The historic Strokestown House, Co. Roscommon

The Saturday formal dinner was held in the historic Strokestown House in Roscommon-the former home of the Packenham Mahon family, built on the site of a 16th Century castle, which was home to the O’Conor-Roe Gaelic Chieftains. It is now the site of the National Famine Museum. We were treated to a fascinating tour of the house on arrival, before enjoying a wonderful dinner, and some fantastic harp-playing. The presidential chain was conferred to the incoming president, Mr Paul Sweeney of The Mercy University Hospital in Cork, and the society are already looking ahead to exciting things during his tenure as president.

 

About the authors:

Dr Clare O’Connell is a first year Urology SpR in the Department of Urology & Transplant in Beaumont Hospital, Dublin (@oconnellclare).

 

 

 

Dr Sorcha O’Meara is a second year Urology SHO in the Department of Urology in The Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin (@sorchaOm).

 

 

 

Article of the week: Effectiveness of a longer urethral stump to prevent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

Every Week, the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

Finally, the third post under the Article of the Week heading on the homepage will consist of additional material or media. This week we feature both a video and a podcast discussing the paper.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Investigating the mechanism underlying urinary continence recovery after radical prostatectomy: effectiveness of a longer urethral stump to prevent urinary incontinence

Yoshifumi Kadono*, Takahiro Nohara*, Shohei Kawaguchi*, Renato Naito*, Satoko Urata*, Kazufumi Nakashima*, Masashi Iijima*, Kazuyoshi Shigehara*, Kouji Izumi*, Toshifumi Gabata† and Atsushi Mizokami*

*Department of Integrative Cancer Therapy and Urology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Japan; †Department of Radiology, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, 13‐1 Takara‐machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920‐8640, Japan

Abstract

Objective

To assess the chronological changes in urinary incontinence and urethral function before and after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to compare the findings of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after RP to evaluate the anatomical changes.

Patients and Methods

In total, 185 patients were evaluated with regard to the position of the distal end of the membranous urethra (DMU) on a mid‐sagittal MRI slice and urethral sphincter function using the urethral pressure profilometry. The patients also underwent an abdominal leak point pressure test before RP and at 10 days and 12 months after RP. The results were then compared with the chronological changes in urinary incontinence.

Fig. 1 Intraoperative view of the apex of the prostate transection line between the urethra and prostate at (A) the normal and (B) long urethral stump positions.

Results

The MRI results showed that the DMU shifted proximally to an average distance of 4 mm at 10 days after RP and returned to the preoperative position at 12 months after RP. Urethral sphincter function also worsened 10 days after RP, with recovery after 12 months. The residual length of the urethral stump and urinary incontinence were significantly associated with the migration length of the DMU at 10 days after RP. The residual length of the urethral stump was a significant predictor of urinary incontinence after RP.

Conclusion

This is the first study to elucidate that the slight vertical repositioning of the membranous urethra after RP causes chronological changes in urinary incontinence. A long urethral residual stump reduces urinary incontinence after RP.

 

Article of the week: External validation of the prostascore model in metastatic hormone‐sensitive PCa patients recruited to the CHAARTED study

Every Week, the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

External validation of the prostascore model in patients with metastatic hormone‐sensitive prostate cancer recruited to the CHAARTED study

Omar Abdel‐Rahman* and Winson Y. Cheung†

*Clinical Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; †Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

Abstract

Objective

To externally validate ‘prostascore’ in patients with metastatic hormone‐sensitive prostate cancer recruited to the phase III CHAARTED study.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective analysis of the prospectively collected data from patients with metastatic hormone‐sensitive prostate cancer in the CHAARTED study, a phase III multicentre study conducted between 2006 and 2014. The main outcome of the present analysis was overall survival, assessed using Kaplan–Meier analysis or log‐rank testing, in the whole cohort according to different prostascores. In addition, patients with different scores were compared according to treatment arm.

Fig 1. Kaplan-Meier curves for (A) overall survival according to Prostascore.

Results

A total of 702 cases had complete baseline data, allowing calculation of prostascores and inclusion in the present analysis. Overall survival was assessed according to prostascores in the entire cohort and the P value for overall survival trend was significant (P < 0.001). Likewise, progression‐free survival was assessed according to prostascores in the entire cohort and the P value for progression‐free survival trend was also significant (P < 0.001). Overall survival comparisons according to treatment arm were evaluated among different prostascores. Notably, the P value for overall survival difference was not significant for a prostascore = 2 (P = 0.702), but was significant for scores of 3, 4 and 5 (P < 0.05). The cause‐specific hazard ratio for cancer‐specific survival (adjusted for treatment arm used) was also evaluated. The P value for pairwise comparisons between different scores was significant (P < 0.01) except for the comparison between scores 4 and 5.

Conclusion

The present study further confirms the role of prostascore in predicting the outcomes of patients with metastatic hormone‐sensitive prostate cancer and also highlights its potential role in therapeutic decision‐making.

Article of the Week: Analysis of hydrogel spacer for PCa RT

Every Week, the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

Finally, the third post under the Article of the Week heading on the homepage will consist of additional material or media. This week we feature a video discussing the paper.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Prospective analysis of hydrogel spacer for patients with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy

Michael Chao*†, Huong Ho† , Yee Chan*‡, Alwin Tan§, Trung Pham¶, Damien Bolton*‡, Andrew Troy*, Catherine Temelcos**, Shomik Sengupta*†† , Kevin McMillan‡, Chee Wee Cham§, Madalena Liu‡, Wei Ding†, Brindha Subramanian†, Jason Wasiak*‡‡, Daryl Lim Joon*†, Sandra Spencer† and Nathan Lawrentschuk*

*The Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Vic., Australia, †Genesis Cancer Care Victoria, Ringwood East, Vic., Australia, ‡Ringwood Private Hospital, Ringwood East, Vic., Australia, §The Bays Hospital, Mornington, Vic., Australia, ¶ The Valley Private Hospital, Mulgrave, Vic., Australia, **St Vincent’s Hospital, Fitzroy, Vic., Australia, ††Melbourne University; Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, Clayton, Vic., Australia, and ‡‡University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia

Abstract

Objective

To report on the dosimetric benefits and late toxicity outcomes after injection of hydrogel spacer (HS) between the prostate and rectum for patients treated with prostate radiotherapy (RT).

Patients and Methods

In all, 76 patients with a clinical stage of T1–T3a prostate cancer underwent general anaesthesia for fiducial marker insertion plus injection of the HS into the perirectal space before intensity‐modulated RT (IMRT) or volumetric‐modulated arc RT (VMAT). HS safety, dosimetric benefits, and the immediate‐ to long‐term effects of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were assessed.

Results

There were no postoperative complications reported. The mean (range) prostate size was 66.0 (25.0–187.0) mm. Rectal dose volume parameters were observed and the volume of rectum receiving 70 Gy (rV70), 75 Gy (rV75) and 78 Gy (rV78) was 7.8%, 3.6% and 0.4%, respectively. In all, 21% of patients (16/76) developed acute Grade 1 GI toxicities, but all were resolved completely by 3 months after treatment; whilst, 3% of patients (2/76) developed late Grade 1 GI toxicities. No patients had acute or late Grade ≥2 GI toxicities.

Conclusion

Injection of HS resulted in a reduction of irradiated rectal dose volumes along with minimal GI toxicities, irrespective of prostate size.

Article of the Month: Retzius-sparing RARP using the Revo-i: results of the first human trial

Every Month, the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Month from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Retzius-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy using the Revo-i robotic surgical system: surgical technique and results of the first human trial

 

Ki Don Chang*†, Ali Abdel Raheem*‡, Young Deuk Choi* , Byung Ha Chung* and Koon Ho Rha*

*Department of Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, †Department of Urology, Urological Science Institute, Yonsei Wonju University College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea, and ‡Department of Urology, Tanta University Medical School, Tanta, Egypt

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the safety and proficiency of the Revo‐i® robotic platform (Meere Company Inc.) in the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa).

Patients and Methods

A prospective study was carried out on 17 patients with clinically localized PCa treated between 17 August 2016 and 23 February 2017 at our urology department using the Revo‐i. Patients underwent Retzius‐sparing robot‐assisted radical prostatectomy (RS‐RARP). The primary objective was to describe the RS‐RARP step‐by‐step surgical technique using the Revo‐i. In addition, the safety of the Revo‐i was assessed according to intra‐operative and the postoperative complications within 30 days of surgery. Early oncological outcomes were also assessed according to surgical margin status and biochemical recurrence (BCR). Continence was defined as use of no or only one pad. Surgeons’ satisfaction with the Revo‐i was assessed using the Likert scale.

Results

All surgeries were completed successfully, with no conversion to open or laparoscopic surgery. The median patient age was 72 years. The median docking time, console time, urethrovesical anastomosis time and estimated blood loss were 8 min, 92 min, 26 min and 200 mL, respectively. One patient was transfused intra‐operatively as a result of blood loss of 1 500 mL. Postoperatively, two patients received blood transfusion, and there were no other serious/major complications. The median hospital stay was 4 days. At 3 months, four patients had positive surgical margins, one patient had BCR, and 15 patients were continent. Most of surgeons were satisfied with the Revo‐i performance.

Conclusions

The first human study for the treatment of patients with localized PCa using the Revo‐i robotic surgical system was carried out successfully. The peri‐operative, early oncological and continence outcomes are encouraging. Further prospective studies are warranted to support our preliminary results.

Article of the Week: NICE Advice – Prolaris Gene Expression Assay

Every Week, the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The summary is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

NICE Advice – Prolaris gene expression assay for assessing long‐term risk of prostate cancer progression

Article of the Week: Performance comparison of two AR-V7 detection methods

Every Week the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Performance comparison of two androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR‐V7) detection methods

Christof Bernemann* , Julie Steinestel*, Verena Humberg*, Martin Bogemann*, € Andres Jan Schrader* and Jochen K. Lennerz†

*Urology, University of Muenster Medical Center, Muenster, Germany, and † Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

 

Abstract

Objectives

To compare the performance of two established androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR‐V7) mRNA detection systems, as paradoxical responses to next‐generation androgen‐deprivation therapy in AR‐V7 mRNA‐positive circulating tumour cells (CTC) of patients with castration‐resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) could be related to false‐positive classification using detection systems with different sensitivities.

Materials and Methods

We compared the performance of two established mRNA‐based AR‐V7 detection technologies using either SYBR Green or TaqMan chemistries. We assessed in vitro performance using eight genitourinary cancer cell lines and serial dilutions in three AR‐V7‐positive prostate cancer cell lines using even 2D barcoded tubes as well as in 32 blood samples from patients with CRPC.

Results

Both assays performed identically in the cell lines and serial dilutions showed identical diagnostic thresholds. Performance comparison in 32 clinical patient samples showed perfect concordance between the assays. In particular, both assays determined AR‐V7 mRNA‐positive CTCs in three patients with unexpected responses to next‐generation anti‐androgen therapy. Thus, technical differences between the assays can be excluded as the underlying reason for the unexpected responses to next‐generation anti‐androgen therapy in a subset of AR‐V7 patients.

Conclusions

Irrespective of the method used, patients with AR‐V7 mRNA‐positive CRPC should not be systematically precluded from an otherwise safe treatment option.

 

Article of the Week: Cost‐effectiveness of MRI and targeted fusion biopsy for early detection of prostate cancer

Every Week, the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Cost‐effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging and targeted fusion biopsy for early detection of prostate cancer

Christine L. Barnett* , Matthew S. Davenport, Jeffrey S. Montgomery, John T. WeiJames E. Montie‡ and Brian T. Denton*

 

*Departments of Industrial and Operations Engineering, Radiology, and Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

 

Objective

To determine how best to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and targeted MRI/ultrasonography fusion biopsy for early detection of prostate cancer (PCa) in men with elevated prostate‐specific antigen (PSA) concentrations and whether it can be cost‐effective.

Methods

A Markov model of PCa onset and progression was developed to estimate the health and economic consequences of PCa screening with MRI. Patients underwent PSA screening from ages 55 to 69 years. Patients with elevated PSA concentrations (>4 ng/mL) underwent MRI, followed by targeted fusion or combined (standard + targeted fusion) biopsy on positive MRI, and standard or no biopsy on negative MRI. Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI‐RADS) score on MRI was used to determine biopsy decisions. Deaths averted, quality‐adjusted life‐years (QALYs), cost and incremental cost‐effectiveness ratio (ICER) were estimated for each strategy.


Results

With a negative MRI, standard biopsy was more expensive and had lower QALYs than performing no biopsy. The optimum screening strategy (ICER $23 483/QALY) recommended combined biopsy for patients with PI‐RADS score ≥3 and no biopsy for patients with PI‐RADS score <3, and reduced the number of screening biopsies by 15%. Threshold analysis suggests MRI continues to be cost‐effective when the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and combined biopsy are simultaneously reduced by 19 percentage points.

Conclusions

Our analysis suggests MRI followed by targeted MRI/ultrasonography fusion biopsy can be a cost‐effective approach to the early detection of PCa.

Residents’ Podcast: CUA 2018 review

Jesse Ory and Andrea Kokorovic
Department of Urology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

Dalhousie residents Jesse Ory and Andrea Kokorovic sum up the highlights of day 1 at the 2018 Canadian Urological Association annual meeting in Halifax

Song credits
Don’t fear the reaper: Blue oyster cult
Mute city: F Zero
Mortal Kombat Theme: The Immortals
Funky Suspense – Bensound.com

BJUI Podcasts now available on iTunes, subscribe here https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/bju-international/id1309570262

 

 

Article of the Month: MRI supported transperineal prostate biopsy

Every Month, the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Month from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is an accompanying editorial written by a prominent member of the urological community. This blog is intended to provoke comment and discussion and we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation.

If you only have time to read one article this week, it should be this one.

Multicentre evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging supported transperineal prostate biopsy in biopsy‐naïve men with suspicion of prostate cancer

 

Nienke L. Hansen*1, Tristan Barrett*, Claudia Kesch, Lana Pepdjonovic§, David Bonekamp, Richard OSullivan**, Florian Distler, Anne Warren*††, Christina Samel‡‡Boris Hadaschik2, Jeremy Grummet§ and Christof Kastner*§§
*CamPARI Clinic, Department of Radiology, Addenbrookes Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, Department of Urology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, §Australian Urology Associates and Department of Surgery, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia, Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, **Healthcare Imaging and Monash University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia, ††Department of Pathology, Addenbrookes Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, ‡‡Institute of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany, and §§Department of Urology, Addenbrookes Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK 

 

Current addresses: 1Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology University Hospital Cologne Cologne Germany, 2Department of Urology University Hospital Essen Essen Germany. 

 

B.H., J.G., and C.K. contributed equally to this work.

 

Abstract

Objectives

To analyse the detection rates of primary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)‐fusion transperineal prostate biopsy using combined targeted and systematic core distribution in three tertiary referral centres.

Patients and Methods

In this multicentre, prospective outcome study, 807 consecutive biopsy‐naïve patients underwent MRI‐guided transperineal prostate biopsy, as the first diagnostic intervention, between 10/2012 and 05/2016. MRI was reported following the Prostate Imaging‐Reporting and Data System (PI‐RADS) criteria. In all, 236 patients had 18–24 systematic transperineal biopsies only, and 571 patients underwent additional targeted biopsies either by MRI‐fusion or cognitive targeting if PI‐RADS ≥3 lesions were present. Detection rates for any and Gleason score 7–10 cancer in targeted and overall biopsy were calculated and predictive values were calculated for different PI‐RADS and PSA density (PSAD) groups.

Results

Cancer was detected in 68% of the patients (546/807) and Gleason score 7–10 cancer in 49% (392/807). The negative predictive value of 236 PI‐RADS 1–2 MRI in combination with PSAD of <0.1 ng/mL/mL for Gleason score 7–10 was 0.91 (95% confidence interval ± 0.07, 8% of study population). In 418 patients with PI‐RADS 4–5 lesions using targeted plus systematic biopsies, the cancer detection rate of Gleason score 7–10 was significantly higher at 71% vs 59% and 61% with either approach alone (P < 0.001). For 153 PI‐RADS 3 lesions, the detection rate was 31% with no significant difference to systematic biopsies with 27% (P > 0.05). Limitations include variability of multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) reading and Gleason grading.

Conclusion

MRI‐based transperineal biopsy performed at high‐volume tertiary care centres with a significant experience of prostate mpMRI and image‐guided targeted biopsies yielded high detection rates of Gleason score 7–10 cancer. Prostate biopsies may not be needed for men with low PSAD and an unsuspicious MRI. In patients with high probability lesions, combined targeted and systematic biopsies are recommended.

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