Archive for category: Urology Guidelines

Video: Guideline of guidelines: social media in urology

Guideline of guidelines: social media in urology

Abstract

The use of social media is rapidly expanding. This technology revolution is changing the way healthcare providers share information with colleagues, patients, and other stakeholders. As social media use increases in urology, maintaining a professional online identity and interacting appropriately with one’s network are vital to engaging positively and protecting patient health information. There are many opportunities for collaboration and exchange of ideas, but pitfalls exist without adherence to proper online etiquette. The purpose of this article is to review professional guidelines on the use of social media in urology, and outline best practice principles that urologists and other healthcare providers can reference when engaging in online networks.

March 2020 – about the cover

The Article of the Month for March 2020 – Guideline of guidelines: social media in urology – was written by Drs Stacy Loeb and Jacob Taylor, who are based in New York City. The cover features the Manhattan skyline as seen from New Jersey, famous for its skyscrapers, which have been built there on bedrock left over from the last ice age at ever-increasing heights since the 1890s, and the song by Norwegian band A-ha. The skyline was dominated by the 1930s-built Empire State and Chrysler buildings until the 1970s when the World Trade Center was completed. The new One World Trade Center is now the tallest building in the city at 1776 feet (541 m) but since the 2000s nine towers over 1000 feet have been built with 16 more being planned. This is partly fuelled by a desire for high city living but also by technological advances meaning thinner bases can be used to support the structures.

 

 

 

Article of the week: Update on the guideline of guidelines: non‐muscle‐invasive bladder cancer

Every week, the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Week from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to this post, there is also a video produced by the authors. Please use the comment buttons below to join the conversation.

If you only have time to read one article this week, we recommend this one. 

Update on the guideline of guidelines: non‐muscle‐invasive bladder cancer

Jacob Taylor , Ezequiel Becher and Gary D. Steinberg

Department of Urology, NYU Langone Health, New York, NY, USA

Abstract

Non‐muscle‐invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is the most common form of bladder cancer, with frequent recurrences and risk of progression. Risk‐stratified treatment and surveillance protocols are often used to guide management. In 2017, BJUI reviewed guidelines on NMIBC from four major organizations: the American Urological Association/Society of Urological Oncology, the European Association of Urology, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. The present update will review major changes in the guidelines and broadly summarize new recommendations for treatment of NMIBC in an era of bacillus Calmette‐Guérin shortage and immense novel therapy development.

Video: Update on the guideline of guidelines: non‐muscle‐invasive bladder cancer

Update on the guideline of guidelines: non‐muscle‐invasive bladder cancer

Abstract

Non‐muscle‐invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is the most common form of bladder cancer, with frequent recurrences and risk of progression. Risk‐stratified treatment and surveillance protocols are often used to guide management. In 2017, BJUI reviewed guidelines on NMIBC from four major organizations: the American Urological Association/Society of Urological Oncology, the European Association of Urology, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. The present update will review major changes in the guidelines and broadly summarize new recommendations for treatment of NMIBC in an era of bacillus Calmette‐Guérin shortage and immense novel therapy development.

Residents’ podcast: NICE Guidance – Transurethral water jet ablation for lower urinary tract symptoms caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia

Nikita Bhatt is a Specialist Trainee in Urology in the East of England Deanery and a BURST Committee member @BURSTUrology

NICE Guidance – Transurethral water jet ablation for lower urinary tract symptoms caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia

Recommendations

  • 1.1 The evidence on transurethral water jet ablation for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) raises no major safety concerns. The evidence on efficacy is limited in quantity. Therefore, this procedure should only be used with special arrangements for clinical governance, consent, and audit or research.
  • 1.2 Clinicians wishing to do transurethral water jet ablation for LUTS caused by BPH should:
    • Inform the clinical governance leads in their NHS trusts.
    • Ensure that patients understand the uncertainty about the procedure’s efficacy and provide them with clear written information to support shared decision‐making. In addition, the use of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) information for the public is recommended.
    • Audit and review clinical outcomes of all patients having transurethral water jet ablation for LUTS caused by BPH. NICE has identified relevant audit criteria and has developed an audit tool (which is for use at local discretion).
  • 1.3 The procedure should only be done by clinicians who have been trained in the technique.
  • 1.4 NICE encourages further research into transurethral water jet ablation for LUTS caused by BPH and may update the guidance on publication of further evidence. Further research should report long‐term follow‐up and include re‐intervention rates.

BJUI Podcasts now available on iTunes, subscribe here https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/bju-international/id1309570262

Residents’ podcast: NICE Guidance – Prostate cancer: diagnosis and management

Mr Joseph Norris is a Specialty Registrar in Urology in the London Deanery. He is currently undertaking an MRC Doctoral Fellowship at UCL, under the supervision of Professor Mark Emberton. His research interest is prostate cancer that is inconspicuous on mpMRI. Joseph sits on the committee of the BURST Research Collaborative as the Treasurer and BSoT Representative.

NICE Guidance – Prostate cancer: diagnosis and management

Context

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, and the second most common cancer in the UK. In 2014, there were over 46,000 new diagnoses of prostate cancer, which accounts for 13% of all new cancers diagnosed. About 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer at some point in their life. Prostate cancer can also affect transgender women, as the prostate is usually conserved after gender-confirming surgery, but it is not clear how common it is in this population.

More than 50% of prostate cancer diagnoses in the UK each year are in men aged 70 years and over (2012), and the incidence rate is highest in men aged 90 years and over (2012 to 2014). Out of every 10 prostate cancer cases, 4 are only diagnosed at a late stage in England (2014) and Northern Ireland (2010 to 2014). Incidence rates are projected to rise by 12% between 2014 and 2035 in the UK to 233 cases per 100,000 in 2035.

A total of 84% of men aged 60 to 69 years at diagnosis in 2010/2011 are predicted to survive for 10 or more years after diagnosis. When diagnosed at the earliest stage, virtually all people with prostate cancer survive 5 years or more: this is compared with less than a third of people surviving 5 years or more when diagnosed at the latest stage.

There were approximately 11,000 deaths from prostate cancer in 2014. Mortality rates from prostate cancer are highest in men aged 90 years and over (2012 to 2014). Over the past decade, mortality rates have decreased by more than 13% in the UK. Mortality rates are projected to fall by 16% between 2014 and 2035 to 48 deaths per 100,000 men in 2035.

People of African family origin are at higher risk of prostate cancer (lifetime risk of approximately 1 in 4). Prostate cancer is inversely associated with deprivation, with a higher incidence of cases found in more affluent areas of the UK.

Costs for the inpatient treatment of prostate cancer are predicted to rise to £320.6 million per year in 2020 (from
£276.9 million per year in 2010).

This guidance was updated in 2014 to include several treatments that have been licensed for the management of
hormone-relapsed metastatic prostate cancer since the publication of the original NICE guideline in 2008.
Since the last update in 2014, there have been changes in the way that prostate cancer is diagnosed and treated. Advances in imaging technology, especially multiparametric MRI, have led to changes in practice, and new evidence about some prostate cancer treatments means that some recommendations needed to be updated.

BJUI Podcasts are available on iTunes, subscribe here https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/bju-international/id1309570262

Residents’ podcast: NICE guidelines: Urinary tract infection

Nikita Bhatt is a Specialist Trainee in Urology in the East of England Deanery and a BURST Committee member @BURSTUrology

NICE guideline: Urinary tract infection (lower): antimicrobial prescribing

This guideline sets out an antimicrobial prescribing strategy for lower urinary tract infection (also called cystitis) in children, young people and adults who do not have a catheter. It aims to optimise antibiotic use and reduce antibiotic resistance.

See also the following related NICE guidelines: Complicated UTIS; and Sepsis

BJUI Podcasts now available on iTunes, subscribe here https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/bju-international/id1309570262

Article of the month: Guideline of guidelines: testosterone therapy for testosterone deficiency

Every month, the Editor-in-Chief selects an Article of the Month from the current issue of BJUI. The abstract is reproduced below and you can click on the button to read the full article, which is freely available to all readers for at least 30 days from the time of this post.

In addition to the article itself, there is a visual abstract produced by one of our creative urologist colleagues and a video prepared by the authors; we invite you to use the comment tools at the bottom of each post to join the conversation. 

If you only have time to read one article this month, it should be this one.

Guideline of guidelines: testosterone therapy for testosterone deficiency

Carolyn A. Salter and John P. Mulhall

Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA

Abstract

We analysed the guidelines for testosterone therapy (TTh) produced by major international medical societies including: the American Urological Association, European Association of Urology, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, British Society for Sexual Medicine, Endocrine Society, International Society for Sexual Medicine, and the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male, and compared their recommendations.

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All the organisations were in general agreement concerning the following key points:

  • Only men meeting the criteria for testosterone deficiency (TD) should be treated.
  • Consider screening asymptomatic men with certain conditions that increase the risk of TD.
  • Exogenous TTh causes impairment of spermatogenesis.
  • There is no evidence that TTh causes prostate cancer.
  • Men on TTh require careful laboratory monitoring.

Video: Guideline of guidelines: testosterone therapy for testosterone deficiency

Guideline of guidelines: testosterone therapy for testosterone deficiency

Abstract

We analysed the guidelines for testosterone therapy (TTh) produced by major international medical societies including: the American Urological Association, European Association of Urology, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, British Society for Sexual Medicine, Endocrine Society, International Society for Sexual Medicine, and the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male, and compared their recommendations.

All the organisations were in general agreement concerning the following key points:

  • Only men meeting the criteria for testosterone deficiency (TD) should be treated.
  • Consider screening asymptomatic men with certain conditions that increase the risk of TD.
  • Exogenous TTh causes impairment of spermatogenesis.
  • There is no evidence that TTh causes prostate cancer.
  • Men on TTh require careful laboratory monitoring.
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