Archive for category: Podcasts

Podcast: NICE Guidance on urinary incontinence in neurological disease

Part of the BURST/BJUI podcast series

Eunice Ter Zuling is a core surgical trainee in South Yorkshire, UK and BURST member. Here she discusses the NICE guidance on urinary incontinence in neurological disease, published in 2021 (https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg148). To contribute a podcast please go to bursturology.com/opportunities.

British Urology Researchers in Surgical Training (BURST) is a research collaborative primarily of urological researchers in the UK. Their aim is to produce high impact multi-centre audit and research which can improve patient care.

Podcast: Comparing outcomes of transperineal to transrectal prostate biopsies performed under local anaesthesia

Part of the BURST/BJUI podcast series

John Hayes is a Urology Clinical Research Fellow at the Lister Hospital, UK
@hayesjdb
The article, published in BJUI Compass, compares and reviews the outcomes of transperineal prostate biopsies with transrectal biopsies performed under local anaesthesia. A review of the relevant published literature is presented.

Podcast: The IDENTIFY Study

Part of the BURST/BJUI podcast series

Podcast:  The IDENTIFY Study: The investigation and detection of urological neoplasia in patients referred with suspected urinary tract cancer; a multicentre observational study 

Mr Sinan Khadhouri is a Specialty Registrar in Urology in the East of Scotland and currently doing his PhD at the University of Aberdeen. He is also the co-vice chair of BURST and the lead trainee on IDENTIFY.

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Podcast: Early outcomes of single‐port robot‐assisted radical prostatectomy: lessons learned from the learning‐curve experience

Part of the BURST/BJUI podcast series

Arjun Nathan is an ST1 in Urology in North London and NIHR Academic Clinical Fellow with the Royal College of Surgeons. He is also the BURST Treasurer and committee member.
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Podcast: Survival following cytoreductive nephrectomy: a comparison of existing prognostic models

Part of the BURST/BJUI Podcast Series

Mr Kenneth MacKenzie MBChB, FRCS (Urol) is a ST7 in Urology in North East England and BURST committee member.

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Podcast: Prostate Health Index and mpMRI to predict PCa grade reclassification in AS

Part of the BURST/BJUI Podcast Series

Mr Joseph Norris is a Specialty Registrar in Urology in the London Deanery. He is currently undertaking an MRC Doctoral Fellowship at UCL, under the supervision of Professor Mark Emberton. His research interest is prostate cancer that is inconspicuous on mpMRI.

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Podcast: Machine learning partial nephrectomy complications

Part of the BURST/BJUI Podcast Series

Arjun Nathan is an ST1 in Urology in North London and NIHR Academic Clinical Fellow with the Royal College of Surgeons. He is also the BURST Treasurer and committee member.

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Residents’ podcast: MIMIC Study

Part of the BURST/BJUI Podcast Series

Mr Chuanyu Gao is a Core Surgical Trainee in KSS Deanery. He graduated from UCL Medical School and obtained his iBSc in Surgical Sciences before completing his Academic Foundation Years in East of England Foundation School. Chuanyu first became involved with BURST on the MIMIC Study as an international site coordinator and has been part of the BURST committee ever since. 

Factors associated with spontaneous stone passage in a contemporary cohort of patients presenting with acute ureteric colic: results from the Multi‐centre cohort study evaluating the role of Inflammatory Markers In patients presenting with acute ureteric Colic (MIMIC) study

Taimur T. Shah*†‡§, Chuanyu Gao*, Max Peters, Todd Manning**, Sophia Cashman*, Arjun Nambiar*, Marcus Cumberbatch*††, Ben Lamb*, Anthony Peacock‡‡, Marieke J. Van Son, Peter S. N. van Rossum, Robert Pickard§§, Paul Erotocritou¶¶, Daron Smith***, Veeru Kasivisvanathan*‡ and British Urology Researchers in Surgical Training (BURST) Collaborative MIMIC Study Group

 

*British Urology Researchers in Surgical Training (BURST), London, UK, Division of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, §Charing Cross Hospital, Imperial Health NHS Trust, London, UK, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands, **Australian Young Urology Researchers Organisation (YURO), Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia, ††Academic Urology Unit, University of Shefeld, Shefeld, ‡‡Information Services Division, University College London (UCL), London, §§Department of Urology, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK, ¶¶Department of Urology, Whittington Hospital, and ***Department of Urology, UCL Hospital, London, UK

 

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Residents’ Podcast: Efficacy of vibegron, a novel β3‐adrenoreceptor agonist, on severe UUI related to OAB

Part of the BURST/BJUI Podcast Series

Nikita Bhatt is a Specialist Trainee in Urology in the East of England Deanery and a BURST Committee member @BURSTUrology

Efficacy of vibegron, a novel β3‐adrenoreceptor agonist, on severe urgency urinary incontinence related to overactive bladder: post hoc analysis of a randomized, placebo‐controlled, double‐blind, comparative phase 3 study

Masaki Yoshida*, Masayuki Takeda, Momokazu Gotoh, Osamu Yokoyama§, Hidehiro Kakizaki, Satoru Takahashi**, Naoya Masumori††, Shinji Nagai‡‡ and Kazuyoshi Minemura‡‡

*Department of Urology, National Centre for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Department of Urology, University of Yamanashi, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kofu, Japan, Department of Urology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, §Department of Urology, Faculty of Medical Science, University of Fukui, Fukui, Department of Renal and Urological Surgery, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Japan, **Department of Urology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, ††Department of Urology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, and ‡‡Kyorin Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan

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Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the efficacy of a novel and selective β3‐adrenoreceptor agonist vibegron on urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) in patients with overactive bladder (OAB). Follow us visaliaweddingstyle for more details .

Patients and Methods

post hoc analysis was performed in patients with UUI (>0 episodes/day) who were assigned to receive vibegron or placebo in a vibegron phase 3 study. Patients were subclassified into mild/moderate (>0 to <3 UUI episodes/day) or severe UUI (≥3 UUI episodes/day) subgroup. Changes from baseline in number of UUI episodes/day, in number of urgency episodes/day, and in voided volume/micturition were compared between the groups. The percentage of patients who became UUI‐free (‘diary‐dry’ rate) and the response rate (percentage of patients with scores 1 [feeling much better] or 2 [feeling better] assessed by the Patient Global Impression scale [PGI]) were evaluated.

Results

Changes in numbers of UUI episodes at week 12 in the vibegron 50 mg, vibegron 100 mg and placebo groups, respectively, were −1.35, −1.47 and −1.08 in all patients, −1.04, −1.13 and −0.89 in the mild/moderate UUI subgroup, and −2.95, −3.28 and −2.10 in the severe UUI subgroup. The changes were significant in the vibegron 50 and 100 mg groups vs placebo regardless of symptom severity. Change in number of urgency episodes/day was significant in the vibegron 100 mg group vs placebo in all patients and in both severity subgroups. In the vibegron 50 mg group, a significant change vs placebo was observed in all patients and in the mild/moderate UUI subgroup. Change in voided volume/micturition was significantly greater in the vibegron 50 and 100 mg groups vs placebo in all patients, as well as in the both severity subgroups. Diary‐dry rates in the vibegron 50 and 100 mg groups were significantly greater vs placebo in all patients and in the mild/moderate UUI subgroup. In the severe UUI subgroup, however, a significant difference was observed only in the vibegron 50 mg group. Response rates assessed by the PGI were significantly higher in the vibegron groups vs placebo in all patients and in the both severity subgroups. Vibegron administration, OAB duration ≤37 months, mean number of micturitions/day at baseline <12.0 and mean number of UUI episodes/day at baseline <3.0 were identified as factors significantly associated with normalization of UUI.

Conclusions

Vibegron, a novel β3‐adrenoreceptor agonist, significantly reduced the number of UUI episodes/day and significantly increased the voided volume/micturition in patients with OAB including those with severe UUI, with the response rate exceeding 50%. These results suggest that vibegron can be an effective therapeutic option for OAB patients with UUI.

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